"CATS IN ART" 23 MARCH - 15 APRIL 2018

7F7D1A8F15784960978005B48EF09EFD.jpg
7DA89AB715434E1BBD59CE7402980735.jpg

SANDRA DURAN WILSON  "ALTITUDE" 10 NOV - 3 DEC 2017

 
front-altitude.jpg
 

NINO BELLATONIO “EARTHKEY” 7 APRIL - 23 APRIL 2017


SHARRON OKINES  “KITCHENALIA” 18 NOV - 4 DEC 2016


TESS BARKER “OSTRANENIE” 18 MAR - 10 APRIL 2016


PAUL MCKEE “ANAMNESIS” 13 - 29 NOVEMBER 2015


“URBANITE” 27 MARCH - 12 APRIL 2015


AMALIA ALEGRIA-WOLFE “ALLEGRO ALEGRIA” 14 -30 NOV 2014


ANIMAL KINGDOM 8 - 24 NOVEMBER 2013


LEAH-KATE HANNAFORD “STRANGE CARGO” 22 MAR - 14 APRIL 2013

backLEAHKATE-HANNAFORD.jpg

READING THE WALLS: AUSTRALIAN & INTERNATIONAL POSTERS IN THE AGE BEFORE TWITTER 5 APRIL - 14 MAY  2012

 A show of political and counter-culture posters in association with JOSEF LEBOVIC.

Posters have been a feature of the public landscape since the invention of the printing press but the great revolution in posters came in the late C.18th with lithography invented in 1796, followed by chromolithography, which allowed for mass editions of posters illustrated in vibrant colours to be printed. Political protest, counter-cultural advertising and all kinds of propaganda flourished on walls in layers of information ephemera pasted and over-pasted all intended to be seen, read and then largely forgotten.From early on in C.19th savvy collectors in London and Paris began to harvest the large, colourful and graphically attractive posters designed by known artists, such as JulesChéret and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Such posters came to be highly prized. So too are many of the posters of C.20th, particularly those of the 1960s and 70s, which flourished with the huge social and cultural protest movements of anti-war, second wave feminism, civil rights and first nations land claims. Some of the best remain icons into C.21st - instantly recognizable and highly collectible.

The Australian and International posters selected for this show from the collection of Josef Lebovic provide a chance to reflect again on the way posters captured the issues of the moment - all on paper in an age before Twitter.

Top right:

79 Earthworks Poster Collective (Aust., active 1971-1980) Second Triennial May Day Palace Revolution Ball, 1977. Colour screenprint, Earthworks logo, studio line and date in image centre right, 74.6 x 49cm. Slight foxing, repainting and repaired tears and creases to corners. Linen-backed. Text continues "Come as your favourite faction. Balmain Town Hall, Sat, April 30, 7-12pm. Sheila. Wasted Daze. Stiletto. Proceeds to Right to Work Campaign and Vietnam Reconstruction. Kids free, $3 usual 'bludgers' discount."

Bottom right:

170 Guttersnipes "Darling It Hurts", 1987. Colour screenprint, Guttersnipes copyright line in image upper right, 76.3 x 51cm. Linen-backed. Text continues "A Super 8 Meta-Realist Musical by Toby Zoates. 7 Years in the life of a singer and a suburb, Darlo. Produced with the assistance of the Creative Development Branch of the [Australian Film] Commission. Dedicated to Little Paul 1970-1987. Thanx [sic] Cha. Hand-printed by T.Z. & Nick at Tin Sheds '87."

 


WHAT THEY SAW FROM THE GROUND: AN EXPLORATION OF WORKS BY DEVELOPING CHILD ARTISTS   26- 30 JAN 2012

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” Pablo Picasso

The twenty-six Grade 1 & 2 Students of Braidwood Central School are certainly gave it their best shot as they embarked on a journey of discovery - a discovery of the world around them. With the guidance of Jude Kovacs, a member of BRAG, it was a journey of imaginative minds. Given freedom to think, express themselves and grow, they discovered art as an outlet that cannot be found in other places; art letting them say what they could not put into words. Every child can pick up a pencil, or a brush to produce something on paper.

These 7 & 8 year olds discovered the difference between just using the tools to draw what is expected of them by the "adult world” and seeing with their own eyes the world in colours, shapes, sounds and emotions. Their sheer pleasure of discovery is reflected in their translation of what they saw from close to the ground with their clear eyesight and active imaginations. In the brilliance of colours and shapes they show us the creation of their "child" world on paper. For these children, people will never again be stick figures, the landscape will always be a wonder of planes and shapes disappearing over the horizon, and a bowl of fruit, a jug or a vase will trigger a vision of a still life filling all the blank paper.

This exhibition celebrates the artistic achievements of these children who show us how imagination is more important than knowledge. As Albert Einstein said, “... knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world".